Government of Canada Announces 2014 Call For Proposals Bid Submission Period for Science and Technology Investments

September 10, 2014

The Government of Canada is seeking proposals in support of the Canadian Safety and Security Program (CSSP) Call for Proposals, for innovative science and technology (S&T) projects.

The CSSP is a whole of government federally-funded program, led by Defence Research and Development Canada’s Centre for Security Science (CSS), in partnership with Public Safety Canada, which provides security and public safety policy guidance to the program. The CSSP supports federal, provincial, or municipal government-led projects in collaboration with response and emergency management organizations, non-governmental agencies, industry, and academia.

As of May 2015, up to $10 million will be available for new projects under the CSSP. The submission period for proposals will be from September 10, 2014 and will close on October 8, 2014. The selected projects will be announced in March 2015.

This competitive call for proposals is part of the CSSP investment that ensures Canadians and their institutions have a greater resilience to global and domestic public safety and security threats, which may include common security and defence requirements. The call for proposals process is administered by Public Works and Government Services Canada, on behalf of Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC). Interested bidders should consult the CSSP information available on buyandsell.gc.ca: https://buyandsell.gc.ca/procurement-data/tender-notice/PW-SV-059-27907.

Quick Facts

  • CSSP projects bring together science and technology, and public safety and security experts from government, industry and academia, nationally and internationally, to develop knowledge and tools, and provide advice that contributes to safeguarding the lives and livelihood of Canadians.
  • Previous Call for Proposals under the same Program:
  • The CSSP funding will support projects and activities that respond to Canadian public safety and security priorities and address capability gaps. These gaps are identified in consultation with safety and security communities of practice, representing policy, operational and intelligence experts.
  • The Canadian Safety and Security Program’s mission is to strengthen Canada’s ability to anticipate, prevent/mitigate, prepare for, respond to, and recover from acts of terrorism, crime, natural disasters, and serious accidents through the convergence of Science and Technology (S&T) with policy, operations and intelligence.
  • Defence Research and Development Canada is the national leader in defence and security science and technology. As an agency of Canada’s Department of National Defence, Defence Research and Development Canada provides the Department of National Defence, the Canadian Armed Forces and other government departments as well as the public safety and national security communities with the knowledge and technology advantage needed to defend and protect Canada’s interests at home and abroad.
  • Public Safety Canada’s mandate is to keep Canadians safe from a range of risks such as natural disasters, crime and terrorism. Public Safety works with all levels of government, first responders, community groups, the private sector and other nations, on national security, border strategies, countering crime and emergency management issues and other safety and security initiatives.

Quotes

“Investing in programs like the Canadian Safety and Security Program (CSSP) supports the development of new capabilities that create a technological advantage for the public safety and national security communities”

– Dr. Marc Fortin, Assistant Deputy Minister (S&T) for the Department of National Defence and Chief Executive Officer of DRDC

“Building resiliency across Canada means exploring how advancements in science and technology can improve our capacity to prepare for and respond to any hazard or disaster, whether natural or man-made. Projects funded through the CSSP provide best-practices and evidence to support informed decision-making across all sectors involved in public safety and national security.”

– Shawn Tupper, Assistant Deputy Minister, Emergency Management and Programs Branch, Public Safety Canada and Co-chair, CSSP Assistant Deputy Minister Steering Committee

Related Products

Backgrounder

Associated Links

Investments in Canada’s Safety and Security 2014

Investments in Canada’s Safety and Security 2013

Information on the Canadian Safety and Security Program

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Contacts

Defence Research and Development Canada
Department of National Defence
Media Relations Office
Phone: 1-866-377-0811

mlo-blm@forces.gc.ca
www.drdc-rddc.gc.ca

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