The Canada – U.S. Enhanced Resiliency Experiment IV (CAUSE IV) – Vignette 1

October 25, 2016

 

Soft music begins.

The United States Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology logo appears on a black background and then fades to a video of flowing water.

Text: (The St. Clair River flows between Lambton County, Ontario and St. Clair County, Michigan) appears on watermark image of connected American and Canadian flags.

Fade to video of the bridge connecting the two counties.

Text: (and separates the two communities by less than 500 yards.)

Fade to head shot interview with Jeff Brooks, Deputy Manager, Lambton County Emergency Medical Services, Canada.

Brooks: We don't see ourselves as two countries. We see Sarnia-Lambton and St. Clair County, Michigan as one community with a river that runs through it.

Cut to head shot interview with Betty Falecki, Emergency Services and Preparedness, Port Huron Medical Center, USA.

Falecki: If we have disasters and we can't communicate to each other, especially with our first responders and ambulances, that can cause a detriment to our healthcare.

Fade to image of American and Canadian flags joined together.

Text: (Canada-U.S. Enhanced Resiliency Experiment IV (CAUSE IV)).

Cut to head shot interview with Dennis Gusty, Program Manager, First Responders Group, DHS Science and Technology Directorate, USA.

Gusty: The Canada-U.S. Enhanced Resiliency Experiment is designed to improve situational awareness and information sharing between the two countries.

Fade to video of blinking ambulance lights, as an ambulance drives out of a garage (Dennis Gusty voice-over continues).

Gusty (voice-over): The first scenario is designed to test interoperability and broadband with sending paramedics in ambulances to and from both countries.

Cut to video of Lambton County and St. Clair County bridge intersection, as trucks pass through the border crossing, and an ambulance speeds.

Falecki (head shot and voice-over): Well, two and from the hospitals, we can directly, in the United States, talk to our ambulances. But unfortunately any ambulances coming from Canada, we cannot talk to directly; they're on a different system. So they're like in a dead zone.

Cut to head shot interview with Jeff Brooks.

Brooks: The goal is to build a network of communication, both data and potentially voice communication that will span the border.

Cut to video of Lambton County and St. Clair County responders communicating via voice and data network using different GPS and tracking technology (Jeff Brooks voice-over continues).

So with this technology we'll be able to maintain communication in the event that the patient deteriorates, there's a problem with the vehicle or the crew or we need directions to get from one place to the other. The other advantage is from a patient care perspective.

Cut to video of responders transmitting live patient care data and a Lambton County paramedic communicating via video with a St. Clair physician at a desk (Jeff Brooks voice-over continues).

So now we'll be able to transmit live data, the patient's current condition, whether it be vital signs, electrocardiograms, video conferencing, to the hospital and to the physician that's receiving the patient. So when we get there, they'll be better able to manage the patient. They'll have a lot more information and be ready for them when they get there.

Cut to head shot interview with Eugene Rosso, Chief, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Port Huron, USA.

Rosso: We are in-between the two countries. We are a speed bump and everything that happens as people are crossing the border. So with emergency managers, it's very important that we get them through as expeditiously as possible, but not hampering and security for the United States. We can do a pre-vetting for those people.

Cut to video of an ambulance and paramedics driving and examining files/data and departing for the United States border (Eugene Rosso voice-over continues).

During the CAUSE IV experiment exercises, we're going to run their information through the system, checking for threat assessment. The officers will do a quick validation. Once that is done the officers will indicate that they may proceed into the United States.

Fade to head shot interview with Doug Socha, Manager, Paramedic Portfolio, Defence Research and Development Canada’s Centre for Security Science, Canada. 

Socha: So looking back on the experiment, I think it was a resounding success, where there's a lot of firsts that were done and certainly from the paramedic side. We were able to transmit a cardiac twelve-lead heart monitors to the hospital. We were actually able to get in touch with U.S. physicians as well as the U.S. dispatch center and the border authorities. And that really allowed us to communicate data and at the same time perform excellent patient care in those environments.

Cut to head shot interview with Joe Fournier, Manager, Wireless Portfolio, Defence Research and Development Canada’s Centre for Security Science, Canada. 

Fournier: This is maintaining the communication and the applications as you move from one network to another. Normally, roaming doesn't support that, but in this case we are maintaining that communication session as the ambulance crosses the bridge from Canada to the U.S. and changes over to the U.S. network.

Cut to video of the Bluewater Health community hospital building in Sarnia (Joe Fournier voice-over continues).

They're still maintaining all applications they have and even the real-time applications, such as video conferencing and whatnot.

Cut to head shot interview with Bill Beveridge, Manager, Security Services, Bluewater Health, Canada. 

Beveridge: What happens in a disaster? You know, those, that simple communication in a secure network, because we all know the regular cell signals are all going to probably crash in the middle of a major disaster, because what does everybody do? We all pull out our cellphones. So this new system, if it, if it's successful and we can implement that technology, could greatly reduce the loss of life. And you know, from our people that would be our patients and our first responders.

Fade to video of flowing water.

Text: (CAUSE is a collaboration among Defence Research and Development Canada’s Centre for Security Science, Public Safety Canada and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate).

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate logo and Canada Wordmark appear below the text.

Soft music fades out

Canada and the United States came together from April 26 to 28, 2016 to assess technologies that can help their respective emergency management officials and responders communicate and exchange information more efficiently during an emergency situation touching both sides of the border.

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